Vote Yes Videos!

Watch Huntington County community members explain why they are voting YES!





For Huntington County Community Schools to maintain our status as a school district that performs at a level of excellence, our community needs to provide the type of safe facilities capable of providing Huntington County youth a technology‐ready, safe and healthy learning environment to compete with schools in neighboring high schools like Homestead, Columbia City, and Carroll. Equally important are the funds necessary to support our students, maintain acceptable class sizes and remain competitive so that our outstanding teachers are not recruited away for other area districts. Providing the referendum funding allows Huntington County Community Schools to attract and retain teachers and provide for needed school safety initiatives


Frequently Asked Questions

Whenever an Indiana school corporation proposes to construct or renovate a school building, the project, depending on the cost, is subject to the referendum process. A referendum is an additional levy raised through property taxes that is not subject to the constitutional tax limits.

The Board of School Trustees passed a resolution that places a referendum question on the November ballot. The referendum will be on the ballot of voters registered to vote in the Huntington County Community School Corporation. (HCCSC) district. All registered voters in Huntington County are in the school district and allowed to vote. A referendum tax levy will only take effect if a majority of the voters from the school district that vote on the referendum ballot question, vote "Yes" to the ballot question. If it passes, the referendum levy would be in effect for a period not to exceed 17 years. It will not fully take effect until 2023. Passing the referendum would allow HCCSC to immediately proceed with the design and construction process.

If the referendum passes, the revenue would be collected by the county through the property tax bills of all property taxpayers in the school district. The money does not pass through the state, but goes directly to the school from the county for the purposes of financing the HCCSC 2020 Safety, Security, Replacement, and Restoration Project.

The HCCSC district boundaries are inclusive of the entire Huntington County and are made up of all Huntington County precincts. Voters in the city of Huntington and other small towns will see municipal candidate races on the ballot. Those in unincorporated Huntington County will only see the two referendum questions on the November ballot.

A school corporation may conduct a referendum to create a property tax rate for purposes of supplementing the revenue it receives from the state funding formula. The Board of School Trustees passed a resolution that states that the referendum would be used to supplement existing revenues for the purposes of funding academic and educationally-related programs, managing class sizes, school safety initiatives and attracting and retaining teachers.

A referendum is an additional levy raised through a special fund titled "referendum fund" for a period not to exceed eight years. However, a referendum tax may be re- imposed or extended under the law if approved by the voters of the district at renewal. The revenue would be collected by the county through the property tax bills of property taxpayers in the school district.

The money does not pass through the state, but goes directly to the school from the county for the purposes of supplementing the education fund of the school corporation that pays for faculty and staff.

The referendum would only be on the ballot of voters registered to vote in the HCCSC district. All registered voters in Huntington County are in the school district and allowed to vote. An Operating Referendum tax levy will only take effect if a majority of the voters from the school district that vote on the referendum ballot question, vote "Yes" to the ballot question. If it passes, the referendum levy goes into effect the following calendar year. The Operating Referendum question will appear on the November ballot with the Construction Referendum.

Construction Project Referendum:
“Shall Huntington County Community School Corporation issue bonds or enter into a lease to finance the 2020 Safety, Security, Replacement, and Restoration Project, which includes the renovation of and improvements to Huntington North High School and other related campus improvements, which is estimated to cost not more than $68,480,000] and is estimated to increase the property tax rate for debt service by a maximum of $0.3381 per $100 of assessed valuation?"


Operating Referendum:
"For the eight (8) calendar years immediately following the holding of the referendum, shall the Huntington County Community School Corporation impose a property tax rate that does not exceed six cents ($0.06] on each one hundred dollars ($100) of assessed valuation and that is in addition to all other property taxes imposed by the school corporation for the purpose of funding academic and educationally-related programs, managing class sizes, school safety initiatives and attracting and retaining teachers?"

Only those who pay property tax in the HCCSC district will pay the referendum tax. Senior citizens, homeowners, mortgage holders and some other types of taxpayers receive exemptions that lower their assessed value and lessen the impact of the tax rate compared to others. By law, the rate is applied to the net assessed value of the property after these deductions. The law does not allow certain classes of taxpayers to be exempt from the rate. For instance, charging only property taxpayers with children in the schools would be considered tuition and against the law established by the Indiana Constitution that says education is tuition free and available to all.

If a majority of those voting on the Construction Project Referendum vote in opposition, HCCSC can not finance the Huntington North High School construction project. If the Operating Referendum fails, HCCSC will not have the required funds to prevents cuts that may drastically alter programming . Another public question on the same or substantially similar referendum may not be submitted to the voters earlier than two years after the date of the election unless a petition is presented allowing it in one year.

The Operating Referendum automatically expires after 8 years. The Construction Project Referendum Bonds (Mortgage) will be issued for 17 years; however, new assessed value in Huntington County can lower the tax rate and the impact on taxpayers over the life of the bonds.

The Operating Referendum automatically “falls off” the tax rolls in eight years. Another referendum election would have to be held and a majority of voters would have to agree for it to continue after eight years. During that time it is hoped that the legislature will return to properly funding public schools and it is expected that student enrollment will slightly increase. The additional revenue generated by more students will eliminate the need for the Operating Referendum. In fact, should the legislature provide additional funding, the tax rate advertised for the referendum does not have to be applied to taxpayers.

The rates for both the Operating Referendum and the Construction Project Referendum are maximum rates that cannot be exceeded.

The tax rate from a successful Operating Referendum could be lowered each year. In fact, it can be eliminated earlier than the eight year period should the school corporation not need the additional funds due to additional assessed value and/or a greater level of funding from the state.

The tax rate for the Construction Project Referendum can be lowered by many factors such as favorable construction bids, lower interest rates, new assessed value in the district, etc. The rate can never exceed the maximum rate or levy as shown in the ballot question.

In an effort to combat aging facilities, Huntington County Community Schools have proposed renovations and improvements to the high school that improve the safety and functional capabilities of this facility that serves Huntington County-area youth.

The completed high school would still make use of the current auditorium, gymnasium, and field house. The updated high school would include properly-sized classrooms, improved technology, and expanded curriculum opportunities.

Replacement of older sections of the high school would eliminate safety and health concerns due to aging and obsolete roof infrastructure, inaccessible blocked sewage system, unhealthy air quality, and failing indoor wall system. Renovating the high school is a long-term, cost-efficient solution to the aging infrastructure problem.

Operating and maintenance cost savings of $85,000 to $125,000 can be used to protect the jobs of teachers.

A new safe and secure entrance would be added.

Yes and no. Design architects used square footage estimates to obtain the price of the proposed updated Huntington North High School. The pictures shown in the community presentations are just simple renderings of what a building of that size could look like. They also show the location of the new construction. If given the permission to move forward, HCCSC will hold multiple forums with community stakeholders, educators, and students to collect input for the project design.

When given permission by the voters, a series of community and stakeholder meetings would be held with the architects to help develop the needs and designs for the building. Once the school is fully designed, the project would move to the bidding process. Following the acceptance of bids, construction can begin. The school will be move in ready by August 2022.

While the total size of Huntington North High School is expected to remain about the same, new heating, cooling, and lighting systems are expected to be more efficient and decrease utility costs. Additionally, annual maintenance and repair costs are expected to decrease for the immediate future.

Renovating the high school is a long-term, cost-efficient solution to the aging infrastructure problem. Operating and maintenance cost savings of $85,000 to $125,000 can be used to protect the jobs of teachers.

The average new school building with future minor renovations is expected to last over 50 years.

Due to the poor, outdated conditions of Huntington North High School, we are unable to provide a 21st century, world-class, educational environment for our district. Here’s what this means:

  • An air-handling infrastructure in classrooms that no longer meets state code for maintaining healthy air quality.
  • A front entrance that fails to provide a safe and secure entry.
  • A roof section of Huntington North High School, opened fifty years ago, has continual roof leaks due to structural issues and an aging infrastructure that is too expensive to retrofit.
  • An inaccessible blocked sewage system that would require jack-hammers to access at levels so deep that the structural integrity of the building would be jeopardized.
  • The high school was built in the late sixties with an open concept utilizing thin movable walls that do not meet state standards for classroom size or safety. These thin walls allow sound to pass between walls resulting in classroom disruption.
  • Currently classrooms do not meet state guidelines for size requirements. The updated high school would see classrooms increase from the current 500-750 sq. ft. to a range of 900-1100 sq. ft.
  • The building does not provide the necessary collaborative technology-ready learning environment critical for higher education careers.
  • Performing arts facilities, due to high student demand, are undersized and do not provide secure climate controlled storage, proper acoustics to practice areas and performing arts technology to meet current standards.
  • Outdated Career Tech tools and technology. Some machine equipment goes back to the 1940’s.
  • The current cafeteria is split into two different areas in order to have the proper amount of space. These two areas are difficult to supervise resulting in more security issues with students moving back and forth.

Our community and business leaders are outspoken on the need and ever-increasing benefits of a new updated high school. They cite both economic and quality of life advantages that a new building will bring to our community. Parents and family members understand the importance of an updated facility for continued academic and program needs of students.

HCCSC enrollment for the 2019-20 school year has stabilized over the last year. This matches our demographers study indicating enrollment declines would level out. Architects use this information in properly sizing the building for proper student learning environments.

No. A second high school for Huntington County is not supported by enrollment data or the funding models used by the State of Indiana since 2009. A second high school requires additional support staff and teaching staff. These additional expenses do not generate any additional revenue and would result in less opportunities for Huntington students. A second high school also does not fix the aging and obsolete infrastructure issues causing health and safety concerns at Huntington North High School.

The academic needs of Huntington North High School will be the architects first priority. Renovations to the high school that allow more academic opportunities with improved technology ready classrooms for students will be a design emphasis.

There will be some new construction in current athletic outdoor areas. By building to the north, we can take the existing soccer field and move that to go east to west. The existing JV softball field will be able to host varsity contests and JV contests.

Kriegbaum Field facilities are in need of renovation, but it will not be addressed in the money generated by the referendum. Any improvements to Kriegbaum Field will have a non-tax impact. HCCSC will continue to work to protect this community asset by ensuring the Huntington taxpayers have a clear title to the property.

Renovating and expanding the high school career technical facilities with technology- ready classrooms providing curriculum demanded by local employers is included in the project.

We know the Learning Center, located next to Kriegbaum Field, is seeing increased demand. The first priority is providing a safe and healthy learning environment in the high school. If bids for the high school are lower than expected, additional expansion of the welding bays and classroom space at the Learning Center would be possible.

HCCSC will also continue to work with the many community partners we have in the Learning Center to find funds that do not impact the taxpayers for this critical job training facility.

No. The priority for this project is on student space. There are no plans to add central administration offices to the high school.

The updated high school would include a cafeteria design in one space to improve security. The current cafeteria is split into two different areas in order to have the proper amount of space. These two areas are difficult to supervise resulting in more security issues with students moving back and forth. We have to provide more supervision in the hallways and restrooms with this amount of student flow. When students are in one area, a safe and secure environment can be managed more effectively. The current cafeteria space located near the front entrance of the high school also creates unsafe access to those without permission, to access our students.

No. The design plan will make use of existing performing arts areas in the final design, including the current auditorium. Higher student demand for the additional performing arts offerings will result in renovations and expansion of the overall performing arts areas in the final design.

Improvements will include reducing unsafe overcrowding in some programing areas, secure climate controlled storage, acoustical upgrades to practice areas, and upgrade performing arts technology to current standards.

The original design for the Huntington North High School Project was about $110 million. This project which was presented as Option A was discussed during the forum. While Option A left the rest of the campus intact, it presented many construction problems including classroom disruption. Construction managers made recommendations to build all new construction outside of the current footprint of the high school and demolish the aging and obsolete section. This resulted in a new project cost of $80 million. Soft costs (financing, etc) brought the total to $88 million.

Additionally, money was set aside from the Roanoke Elementary Project bond which can only be used on the high school campus. This bond was within the borrowing power of the schools and did not raise the tax rate. The $40 million bond allocated an additional $20 million for the high school project, resulting in the overall amount asked on the ballot question of $68 million.

Construction managers will manage the project to ensure high quality construction, best bid practices and efficient use of the construction dollars.

The bond payments for the three elementary schools, Andrews, Flint Springs, Lincoln and the high school field house will end in 2022 releasing $22 million from the debt service fund.

The impact of the referendums are determined by this formula:
(Gross Assessed Value)-(Deductions) ➗ 100 X ((Construction Project Referendum Rate) + (Operating Referendum Rate))

The impact to your property can be found by using the State of Indiana Department of Local Government Finance Referendum Impact Calculator. Instructions and a link can be found on this site by clicking here.

The only impact to your taxes that can accurately be measured is for next year. That is also the greatest impact over the life of the bonds. As assessed value goes up in the district the "levy" of the bonds is shared by more, reducing the impact to everyone.

Also, debt is strategically planned to fall away from the debt service fund which will also reduce the impact to your taxes. The full impact of the construction referendum doesn’t begin until 2023. By then, it will be at a rate less than the maximum rate due to changes in assessed value.

The rate that appears in the Construction Referendum ballot question is the maximum rate over the life of the bonds. This maximum rate of $0.3381 per $100 of NET assessed value will likely never be reached. The school corporation is required to file a payment schedule with the State that shows the tax impact (based on 2018’s assessed value of the school district) for each year of the construction loan. This maximum rate on the ballot and used by the Indiana Department of Local Government Finance (DLGF) is shown on the payment schedule.

The Construction Project Referendum is designed to have the least possible impact on the taxpayer. It is also a levy based rate and will decrease as the assessed value of the district goes up with new growth.

The DLGF confirms this on their website with a disclaimer that reads, “It is possible that the unit’s existing tax rates will change in coming years, particularly those for any outstanding debt scheduled to expire. It is also possible that the unit will not impose the maximum rate for which it is seeking approval through the referendum for the entire life of the referendum levy. Specific questions about debt amortization and related issues should be directed to the proper officials of the unit seeking the referendum.”

The Operating Referendum is very straight forward in that the maximum rate is always the same over the eight year life of the tax impact. The maximum rate for the operating referendum is $0.06 per $100 of Net Assessed Value. The impact is unaffected, unlike the Construction Project Referendum, by an increase in the district assessed valuation.

Laws passed by the Indiana legislature do not allow Local Income Tax or Sales Tax to be used for the purposes of school construction or supplementing operating funds received from the State. Local Income Tax decisions are made by other government entities in the county.

The composition of the Huntington County taxpayer base by property tax class, based on 2019 Assessed Value (AV) is the following:

Property ClassGross AVNet AV
Homesteads
(1% cap)
52%28%
Residential Commercial
(2% cap)
8%12%
Farmland
(2% cap)
11%17%
Other Commercial
(3% cap)
29%43%

This chart shows that after property tax deductions are taken (Net AV,) Huntington County residences (apartments and owner-occupied homes) make up 40% of the tax base.

No. Some facebook posts are doing their very best to distort the facts about the referendum. One way to tell if a group is being less than truthful is if they claim the referendum will increase everyones taxes by a certain percentage. Property taxes do not work that way. It is impossible to put one percentage on the increase in taxes due to the referendum. The impact on every property as a percentage is different depending on where the property’s location, deductions and credits. Those that tell you differently will say anything to influence your vote.

In every presentation the school has given they have used the example of a home assessed at $100,000. The tax impact on that home is $133.88 per year or $11.16 per month. That’s a fact for a home with the two homestead deductions and the mortgage deduction. The lower your current overall tax bill, the higher that increase is as a percentage. For a home in Andrews the tax impact will be 12% LESS than a home in Lancaster township. However, they both still will have the exact same $133.88 yearly impact to their tax bill.

The need for improvements at the high school and for additional funding for our teachers doesn’t change either. You have to decide on your own if it is time to address the learning environment the Huntington community is providing to your youth.

Use the tax calculator provided by the Indiana Department of Local Government Finance to determine your tax impact. You can find that calculator and instructions at buildforourfuture.com/#impact

If you would like a more exact analysis, email info@buildforourfuture.com with your property address.

No. First it is important to understand how school projects over $5 million have to be funded. The biggest fund of the property tax supported funds is the debt service fund. That’s where the big projects occur like we’re talking about in this referendum. Debt service is the “mortgages” or bonds used to finance large projects. These are the only way that Indiana allows schools to build projects. For example, schools can’t save up money for a big project like like a homeowner could for a kitchen remodel or addition. Schools have to “mortgage” (bond) for the project. The State of Indiana only allows schools to spend what they tax in a given year. Indiana schools can’t save up extra money for a large construction project. And so, the debt service fund is where schools build these projects by basically mortgaging. Now, most all of us have mortgages, and we typically try to pay those mortgages off by the time we retire. But a school never retires. A school always has debt if it’s taking care of its facilities as it should. A school without any debt is a school system where you’ll find neglected facilities.

The long term plan for HCCSC facilities includes allowing for debt that is being paid off to be utilized for other facility needs across In 2023 the School Corporation will pay off the bonds used to build Andrews, Flint Springs, Lincoln, and the HNHS Field House. That will release $22 million from the debt service fund, NOT the $40 million figure listed in the newspaper ad. This figure has been calculated by Baker Tilly (formerly Umbaugh), a professional financial consulting firm used across the State of Indiana by municipalities and school corporations. These funds, combined with the $20 million already allocated to the HNHS project, are not enough to address the urgent needs at HNHS. Further, we will need these funds to maintain our 8 other buildings in an effort to avoid putting future boards in the type of urgent situation that we are currently facing at HNHS.

The need for major improvements at HNHS is real. We cannot wait 3 more years to address these needs.

You have to decide on your own if it is time to address the learning environment the Huntington community is providing to our youth.

The total scope of this project is as follows:

  1. Build a new 2-story addition on the north side of the gymnasium and fieldhouse to house all core academic classes and programs. This also provides emergency egress from the second story of the 2. north gymnasium (which does not currently exist).
  2. Build a new addition on the east side of the auditorium to house all performing arts classes and programs.
  3. Build a new 2-story addition on the west side of the auditorium to house all agriculture, vocational, family and consumer science, and visual art classes and programs. This also provides emergency egress from the second story of the south gymnasium (which does not currently exist).
  4. A new secure main entrance will be created with all HNHS offices located at one centralized location.
  5. Relocation of the soccer and softball fields that will be displaced by the new north addition.
  6. Demolition (including abatement) of the old building with the exception of the auditorium, gymnasium and fieldhouse.
  7. All site work associated with the new additions. Also, all site work associated with returning the old building site to finish grade.
  8. Reconfiguration and installation of all parking lots and traffic loops to adequately service the car and bus needs of the new building.
  9. All architectural, engineering and construction management fees associated with the abovementioned scope of work.
  10. All soft costs associated with the abovementioned scope of work.

There is not a “formal” blueprint of the proposed building detailed above. The architectural fees associated with designing a building of this size are in the neighborhood of $1 million. The board feels that it would be irresponsible to spend that amount of taxpayer money until the public grants permission for the project to proceed. What the design team has done thus far is to create a schedule of the spaces needed (so many classrooms, so many restrooms, so many offices, number and size of hallways required by code, etc.). They then assign required square footages to each of those line items to establish a total square footage of the proposed building. This total square footage allows them to show vague renderings of how the proposed building would generally fit with the remaining HNHS building pieces. The construction manager also uses this square footage to estimate the project in dollars per sq.ft. They have a team of estimators whose sole job is to estimate commercial construction projects in NE Indiana, all day, every day. They use historic pricing data, in addition to current market conditions, to create the estimates. Furthermore, to put credence to their estimate, they will provide a guaranteed maximum price once the project goes to bid. The estimate is only used for the purpose of creating a MAXIMUM value needed from the referendum. All actual construction costs will be determined at the time of bidding. Again, this is an estimate, NOT a bid.

To be clear, the roof is only one of many reasons leading to this referendum. The estimate to replace the roof on the existing building requires some backstory. In 2015, the roofs on the gymnasium and part of the auditorium were replaced. These two areas have a simple membrane roof, much different than the structure of the rest of the building. During the pre-bid meeting for this project on February 9, 2015, representatives were present from RK Hydrovac, McGuff Roofing, Nu-Tec Roofing, Horning Roofing, Fort Wayne Roofing & Sheetmetal, Morris & Sons Roofing, CL Schust, Ohio & Indiana Roofing, and Dahm Brothers Roofing. At the conclusion of the pre-bid meeting, which was held on the roof’s surface, the architect explained the pending need and the details of the structure of the rest of the roof to those in attendance. He then had a dialogue with those in attendance about how they would tackle the project, and inquired about estimating a project of this scope. The consensus of the group was that the only way to do it right, would be to strip it down to the original roof joists, and start over. The rough estimate, based on the scope of work, the possible amount of work that could be completed per week, the number of climate-fit working weeks per year, and the total square footage, came to between $15-16 million.

The board and district leaders were aware of the needs at HNHS when the decision was made to build the new Roanoke Elementary. Therefore, the bond designated to pay for Roanoke Elementary specifically reads “…includes the construction of a new elementary school…and the renovation of and improvements to Huntington North High School campus.” The original portion of the current Roanoke Elementary is approximately 90 years old and not ADA compliant. The initiation of the building process for both projects started at the same time, however HNHS became a much slower process due to the massive scope and complexity of the project. Both projects were/are critical, and neither is more/less important than the other.

By law, the revenue collected from the project referendum can ONLY be used on the campus of HNHS (this includes the Learning Center). The number one priority is the main academic building that the community knows as HNHS. If there are funds remaining, the next priority would be additional classroom and vocational space at the Learning Center. Beyond these two facilities, the funds from the referendum cannot legally be used at any other property in the district. Additionally, it is important to note that the tax rate and total dollar amount advertised in the referendum are both maximum “not to exceed” amounts. In other words, not all of the funds have to be used if they are not needed.

The first drawback in operating two high schools is that the community would have to support the cost of building two high schools. Two schools, each with half of the total enrollment, would each cost more than half of the total cost of one building. This is due to the areas that would have to be duplicated in two buildings, that could otherwise be in one space in one building. The required increase in overhead to operate two high schools also makes this option impractical. The funding received from the State of Indiana and other tax dollars would not increase with a second high school. There are far too many faculty positions that would have to be duplicated (one at each location) that can currently be completed by one position in one location. By operating one high school countywide, it affords our community the opportunity for a broader range of class selection, more academic programming and a much broader range of extracurricular activities for the students.

The vast population makes combining the middle schools and high school impractical. Our community’s middle schools currently each have approximately 600+/- students and the high school has approximately 1400+/- students. That means that a combined building would have approximately 2600+/- students ranging in age from 11-18.

The current school board understands and appreciates the value and need for regular maintenance. As a matter of fact, in the last two years, HCCSC’s maintenance staff and contractors have completed numerous overdue maintenance projects across the district, including roofs, carpet, HVAC units, exterior façade renovations, wood framed window replacement, parking lot coating and lighting, track resurfacing, secure entrance upgrades, and much more. The corporation has also put approximately $1.3 million in a rainy-day fund, which is the first time in HCCSC history that a rainy-day fund has existed. While we acknowledge that this hasn’t always been a priority in the past, the current board wasn’t involved at that time to know why those decisions were made. The board and school leaders are currently doing everything in our power to get HCCSC “caught up” and set the groundwork so that this doesn’t happen again.

The easy answer to this question is that at least one is present, and probably both. The original roof on the building was a coal tar pitch roof. Coal tar pitch is another term for creosote. We think that there is also an asbestos insulative substrate below the coal tar pitch. Because of the inability to access this area, we are unable to confirm this suspicion. The reality is that both products are hazardous, and are both abated in the same manner. The positive side of this is that these products (either one or both) are located above the original steel roof deck, which means that they are isolated from the interior of the building. There is currently no health risk from these products because of this barrier.

The only athletic fields that will be addressed using funds from the referendum are the fields that will be displaced by the new building addition (soccer and softball). All other funds generated by the referendum will be used for the academic building.

Kriegbaum field is an important community asset that needs to be protected. This property has been owned, improved and maintained by the taxpayers of Huntington county since the consolidation of 1964, and prior to that by the taxpayers of the city of Huntington and the City Schools of Huntington dating back to 1928. HCCSC is simply seeking confirmation that there is a clear deed to the property so that this community asset can be protected, while also preserving the Kriegbaum legacy.

The roof at the high school was much more than a minor concern two years ago. The roof has been of significant concern for several years. As stated earlier, the architect discussed it at length with representatives from 9 different roofing companies in early 2015. Additionally, every year that goes by, the roof becomes another year further deteriorated. The roof is only one of numerous reasons that led to the initiation of looking into the HNHS project in 2017. It took the collaboration of a unanimous board, vested district leadership, and numerous other staff members to begin the massive task of diving into this problem.

The air at HNHS is currently safe, however not ideal. The district leadership and staff of HNHS would never allow the continued operation of an unsafe learning environment. That being said, conditions in the school do often become quite uncomfortable, especially when outdoor conditions reach extremes. New equipment will only be bought from reputable, long standing companies. However, that still doesn’t guarantee that they will have parts available 50 years from now. The difference in a new building, as compared to our current building, is the way in which the HVAC systems are designed. The current building has just a few large air handling units that serve the entire building. These units are located in an area of the building that is hard to get to. A new system would consist of several smaller units working in a unified system and strategically placed around the building where they can be easily accessed. By designing the system in this manner, it makes each individual unit less critical to the system as a whole (if one unit is down for service, the area affected is much smaller). Smaller units are also more common and thus easier to acquire parts for. Also, if one unit needs replaced in the future, this type of system is much more cost effective to replace because you can do it one manageable piece at a time.

The air at HNHS is currently safe, however not ideal. The district leadership and staff of HNHS would never allow the continued operation of an unsafe learning environment. That being said, conditions in the school do often become quite uncomfortable, especially when outdoor conditions reach extremes. New equipment will only be bought from reputable, long standing companies. However, that still doesn’t guarantee that they will have parts available 50 years from now. The difference in a new building, as compared to our current building, is the way in which the HVAC systems are designed. The current building has just a few large air handling units that serve the entire building. These units are located in an area of the building that is hard to get to. A new system would consist of several smaller units working in a unified system and strategically placed around the building where they can be easily accessed. By designing the system in this manner, it makes each individual unit less critical to the system as a whole (if one unit is down for service, the area affected is much smaller). Smaller units are also more common and thus easier to acquire parts for. Also, if one unit needs replaced in the future, this type of system is much more cost effective to replace because you can do it one manageable piece at a time.





Impact

In a November 5, 2019 general election, voters located within the boundary of the Huntington County Community School Corporation (all of Huntington County) will see on their ballot two referendum questions asking them if they support an increase in property taxes to fund operational expenses for academic and educationally-related programs, managing class sizes, school safety initiatives and attracting and retaining classroom teachers?

 

A construction project referendum that consists of improvements to Huntington North High School will be listed as the second question, asking voters to support funding for the life of the bonds.

 

The language of the two questions as required by Indiana Code and approved by the Dept. of Local Govt. Finance is:

 

Construction Referendum

“Shall Huntington County Community School Corporation issue bonds or enter into a lease to finance the 2020 Safety, Security, Replacement, and Restoration Project, which includes the renovation of and improvements to Huntington North High School and other related campus improvements, which is estimated to cost not more than $68,480,000] and is estimated to increase the property tax rate for debt service by a maximum of $0.3381 per $100 of assessed valuation?"

 

Operating Referendum

"For the eight (8) calendar years immediately following the holding of the referendum, shall the Huntington County Community School Corporation impose a property tax rate that does not exceed six cents ($0.06] on each one hundred dollars ($100) of assessed valuation and that is in addition to all other property taxes imposed by the school corporation for the purpose of funding academic and educationally-related programs, managing class sizes, school safety initiatives and attracting and retaining classroom teachers?"

 

By voting “Yes“ on the ballot questions, the tax impact to the households in our district is minimal, but the impact on our schools is significant. A homestead valued at $100,000 will see a modest $130.38 increase per year. The median home value in Huntington County is $102,700. Those homeowners can approximate about a $137 increase per year or under $12 per month.

 

Referendum Calculator

The impact of the referendums are determined by this formula:

(Gross Assessed Value)-(Deductions)➗ 100 X ((Construction Referendum Rate)+(Operating Referendum Rate))

 

Step 1. Determine your Gross Assessed Value (GAV)

Find the GAV for your property by going to this link for Indiana Assessed Property Values.
Using the most recent assessment year, search for a property by street address (parcel number optional) and locate the link titled ‘Details’. Find the value labeled "Assessed Value Total Land and Improvements". This value will be highlighted in yellow and is the number to enter into the calculator.

 

 

Step 2. Go to this link for The Referendum Calculator

A. Use the drop down box to “Select a county” (see image) and select Huntington County.

B. From the drop down box “Select a referendum” choose Huntington County Community School Corporation Capital Referendum

C. Enter the Gross Assessed Value number from Step 1 into the box with no commas or dollar sign

D. From the drop down box “Select a property type” choose the correct property type. Be sure and select “Homestead” for owner-occupied homes to automatically apply the proper homestead deductions.

E. Select additional deductions the property receives. The majority of properties need to check mortgage deduction.

 

 

Step 3. Estimate Impact

After you click the “Estimate Impact” the Estimated Referendum Impact box will appear. The referendum is the maximum rate the school can use. The first line shows this maximum annual amount due as a result of the referendum. The second line is required by the legislature and shows what the total of the yearly tax bill would be if the maximum amount was collected every year for seventeen years. This assumes your assessed value and deductions are the same for the next seventeen years. No other government entity tax rate is required to show what your tax bill would be over seventeen years! The only impact to your taxes that can accurately be measured are for next year. Line 4 shows the “Assessed Value” of your property after deductions have been applied.

 

 

Step 4. Repeat for the Operating Referendum impact by starting at Step 2 B above and instead from the drop down box “Select a referendum” choose Huntington County Community School Corporation Operating Referendum





Where to Vote


The municipal general election is officially November 5, 2019.

Absentee ballots may be requested anytime before the election up until 8 days before the election. (11:59pm, October 28, 2019) They must be received by Monday, November 4th at noon.

Voter registration applications must be postmarked or hand delivered to the county voter registration office no later than 29 days (October 7, 2019) before the election. Voter registration can occur online at indianavoters.com until midnight that day. This same deadline applies to change of voter information such as a change in address or married name.

In Indiana, only those individuals who are 18 by November 5, 2019 can vote for the referendum.

Only the voters registered to vote in the Huntington County Community School Corp. (HCCSC) district will be voting on the two referendums. The HCCSC district boundaries are inclusive of the entire Huntington County and are made up of all Huntington County precincts.  Voters in the city of Huntington and other small towns will see municipal candidate races on the ballot. Those in unincorporated Huntington County will only see the two referendum questions on the November ballot.

Election day voting will take place at vote center located within Huntington County. The polling locations open at 6:00 am and close at 6:00 pm. A voter in line at 6:00 pm will be allowed to vote. Registered voters are required to bring a government issued picture ID. Voting for the referendum is allowed at any of the vote centers in Huntington County.

The Huntington County Election Board has approved the following Vote Centers to be open on Election Day, Tuesday, November 5 from 6:00 am to 6:00 pm:
Huntington County Courthouse, 201 N Jefferson St, Huntington
4H Fairgrounds Heritage Hall, 631 E Taylor St, Huntington
YMCA, 1160 W 500 N, Huntington
Nazarene Church, 1555 Flaxmill Road, Huntington
Cottage Event Center, 9524 US 24 N, Roanoke
Warren Church of Christ, 302 N Main St, Warren

A referendum tax levy will only take effect if a majority of the voters from the school district that vote on the referendum ballot question, vote "Yes" to the ballot question. If it passes, the referendum levy goes into effect the following calendar year.

SEND US A MESSAGE

We are here to answer any questions you might have. Reach out to us with a comment or a question and we’ll respond just as soon as we can.